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Police seize nearly 300 vehicles for lockdown violation

Markets swarm with people during the window period

The city police is cracking down on unauthorised movement of vehicles during the lockdown hours amidst surge in the number of COVID-19 positive cases.

Nearly 300 vehicles were seized in the last 24 hours alone and the Commissioner of Police Chandragupta himself was on the roads on Friday.

The seized vehicles include autorickshaws, goods vehicles, 28 cars and over 250 two-wheelers. The owners of the vehicles have been booked for violation of the Janata curfew norms.

Mr. Chandragupta said though there is a window between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. for purchase of essential commodities many motorists were seen on the streets beyond the stipulated hours and hence the vehicles were seized.

He warned the public against unwanted movement in view of the prevailing COVID-19 conditions and said that there were certain category of trade and people exempted from the curfew while ambulance and vehicles on an emergency errand were also allowed to move.

There is also a growing tendency of the people not to procure any essential commodities locally but to rush to the heart of the city around Devaraja Market which tends to be crowded like normal days during the window period of 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. This was also witnessed around the Small Clock Tower, Shivarampet etc.

As a result social distancing norms are being violated regularly while a majority tend to wear the mask improperly and only to comply with the government directive. Hence it is not serving any purpose in keeping the people safe and prevent the spread of COVID-19

But outside the window period, trades and businesses declared as non-essential remained shut but pharmaceutical shops remained open. The number of passengers arriving and departing from the city by various modes of transportation was negligible.

Sources in the railway said the number of people travelling in the intra-State trains were in two digits but there was good patronisation for inter-State long-distance services as they were fully reserved coaches.

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