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Haryana: Berwala Bird Safari gets a clean look

A plan was mooted for repairing of the around 5-km-long nature trail, leading to the safari through the ridges of safari's surrounding hills starting from Panchkula-Morni road.

The Haryana forest and wildlife department has cleaned the wild growth, bushes, parthenium hysterophorus locally known as congress grass from around the Berwala Bird Safari, which had been in need of dire attention for the last two years.

A plan was mooted for repairing of the around 5-km-long nature trail, leading to the safari through the ridges of safari’s surrounding hills starting from Panchkula-Morni road. A tractor with the ploughing equipment was used for cleaning the bushes, congress grass spread in almost half-acre land between the two water bodies. The department has planted the seeds of certain plants, which attracts the birds, grass for certain animals.

Divisional Wildlife Officer, Panchkula, Shyam Sunder Kaushik, said, “A tin-shed, under which iron-wooden benches are installed to sit on, were also being repaired. The sitting place had become a den of reptiles due to the overgrown wild grass. We removed and cleaned the entire area. But a lot of work, including the fixing of a machaan on a tree, is yet to start. The budget proposal for the repairing of the nature trail was sent to the office of chief wildlife warden for approval.”

Sources said though there are two tin-sheds at the safari, the department will repair only one due to the lack of funds. Berwala Bird Safari, once a paradise for bird enthusiasts and nature lovers, was in a shambles. It was constructed in 2004. It is located within Khol-Hai Raitan Wildlife Sanctuary. No maintenance work took place at the safari in the last two years. The last partial maintenance work happened when two nature trails were cleaned and marked in 2017. Chandigarh Newsline had highlighted the dilapidated condition of the safari last month.

Former chief wildlife warden, Haryana, Dr R D Jakati, along with naturalist Lt Gen Baljeet Singh (Retd), a member of Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS), were credited for the construction of this safari.

There are two tin sheds for visitors, which are in a dilapidated condition. A wooden machan, which was made on the bough of a huge banyan tree, has gone missing. The middle portion of the wooden signboard depicting Berwala Bird Safari was completely damaged by the termite.

However, the ironmade signboard, which was not visible due to the overgrown bushes, is now clearly visible.

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